Lumina Foundation » Newsroom http://www.luminafoundation.org Lumina is committed to enrolling and graduating more students from college. In fact, we are the nation's largest foundation dedicated exclusively to increasing students' access to and success in postsecondary education. Our mission is defined by Goal 2025-to increase the percentage of Americans who hold high-quality degrees and credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Tue, 29 Jul 2014 19:50:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.1 Focus Summer 2014 | College-bound communities http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/focus/2014-07.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/focus/2014-07.html#comments Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:15:45 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22671 More »]]> More »]]> http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/focus/2014-07.html/feed/ 0 Lumina Ideas Summit: New pathways to higher education diversity http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/fisher_summit.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/fisher_summit.html#comments Tue, 17 Jun 2014 05:17:24 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22403 Watch now »]]> #body-inner { width: 990px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #body-inner p { width: 700px; font-size: 12pt; margin: 0px 0px 24px 250px; } #body-inner figcaption { font-size: 11pt; margin: 6px; } #body-inner .rotatingtweets { width: 100% !important; } #body-inner p.rtw_main { margin: 10px; width: 100% !important; } #prettyTheSequel { margin-left: 0px; text-align: left; min-height: 140px; } table.quads { border-collapse: separate; border-spacing: 10px; }

Ronald Reagan Building and
International Trade Center

1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC
317-951-5300

June 17, 2014, 9am Eastern

This summit will reinforce the importance of racial and socioeconomic diversity in higher education, and identify new paths to achieving these goals relative to legal constraints recently determined by the U.S. Supreme Court.

As the U.S. student population becomes increasingly diverse, ensuring access to selective colleges and universities has become more and more important. While the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions in Fisher v. University of Texas and Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action impose new hurdles to considering race in university admissions, new research suggests colleges can increase both racial and economic diversity through a variety of creative strategies.

Part 1

9:10amKeynote Address: The Imperative to Act
Nancy Cantor, Chancellor, Rutgers University—Newark
Derron Wallace
9:40amSetting the Stage
Arthur Coleman, Managing Partner, Education Counsel, LLC
Scott Greytak, Attorney at Law, Campinha Bacote LLP
Catherine Lhamon, Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights
Moderator: Richard Kahlenberg, Senior Fellow, The Century Foundation

Part 2

10:10amState Experiences
Richard McCormick, President Emeritus, Rutgers University
Matthew Gaertner, Research Scientist, Center for College and Career Success, Assessment and Instruction, Pearson
Halley Potter, Policy Associate, The Century Foundation
Moderator: Sam Fulwood, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
 

Part 3

11:00amPromising Practices
John Brittain, Law Professor, School of Law, University of the District of Columbia
Sheryll Cashin, Professor of Law, Georgetown University
Anthony Carnevale, Director, Center on Education and the Workforce, Georgetown University
Jessica Howell, Executive Director of Policy Research, College Board
Moderator: Jamie Merisotis, President & CEO, Lumina Foundation

Part 4

12:00pmHelping Universities Act—Policy Proposals
Richard Kahlenberg, Senior Fellow, The Century Foundation
Susan Johnson, Director of Equity and Inclusion, Lumina Foundation
The views expressed in this webcast are those of its speakers and do not necessarily represent the views of Lumina Foundation, its officers or employees, as well as The Century Foundation, its officers or employees.

Follow the twitter conversation at #HEDiversity


Related:
If Affirmative Action Is Doomed, What’s Next? | David Leonhardt | New York Times | June 17, 2014
What Sotomayor Gets Wrong About Affirmative Action | Richard Kahlenberg | Chronicle of Higher Education | June 17, 2014
Race-Blind Affirmative Action? | Jake New | Inside HigherEd | June 18, 2014

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New Research: Affirmative Action Based on Disadvantage Could Increase Racial Diversity at America’s Most Elite Colleges http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/news_releases/2014-06-17.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/news_releases/2014-06-17.html#comments Tue, 17 Jun 2014 04:16:08 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22505 More »]]> WASHINGTON–()–New research reveals African-American and Hispanic enrollments at America’s 193 most elite colleges would more than double if the top ten percent of every class were guaranteed admission and students from low socioeconomic backgrounds were given an admissions boost.

The research, authored by Anthony P. Carnevale, Stephen J. Rose, and Jeff Strohl, is featured in a new book launched by the Century and Lumina Foundations entitled The Future of Affirmative Action: New Paths to Higher Education Diversity after Fisher v. University of Texas.

The case for affirmative action based on disadvantage is now clear. #HEDiversity

“Our analyses demonstrate that there are sizable numbers of minorities and low-income students who can improve diversity at the 193 “Most” and “Highly” selective colleges as listed in Barron’s Profiles of American Colleges, without appreciably lowering college-wide test scores and thereby graduation rates,” said Georgetown University Professor Anthony P. Carnevale.

Carnevale and his team modeled the effects of three race-neutral admissions plans, shown in the figure below, compared with the status quo and a pure merit-based admissions model.

Admitting the top ten percent of students from each high school class based on test-scores alone would increase African American enrollments from 4% to 6% and Hispanic enrollments from 7% to 11%, while also increasing the mean SAT score from the current 1230, to 1254.

Admitting the top ten percent, combined with taking into account sophisticated SES factors – such as family income, savings and education – African American and Hispanic enrollments would double to 9% and 14% respectively, while mean SAT scores would lower only modestly to 1160.

“The case for affirmative action based on disadvantage is now clear,” said Richard Kahlenberg, TCF senior fellow and editor of The Future of Affirmative Action: New Paths to Higher Education Diversity after Fisher v. University of Texas.

“Colleges need to get their heads out of the sand and start taking action to ensure racial diversity is maintained on campuses, even where race-based affirmative action is longer an option.”

The book, launched at a Lumina Ideas Summit in Washington DC today, features articles from college presidents, chancellors and administrators, as well as academics, lawyers and economists and represents a major step forward in the campaign for continued diversity on college campuses in the wake of recent Supreme Court decisions that have cast doubt over race-based admissions policies.

“We’re very pleased to support the publication of this timely and important new book,” said Jamie Merisotis, Lumina’s president and CEO. “Lumina is committed to fostering equity and excellence in higher education, and we believe the fresh thinking reflected in this volume can contribute significantly to that effort.”

Alternatives to race-based affirmative action explored in the book include:

  • Sophisticated SES measures that take into account parental income, education and savings, as well as neighborhood factors such as school poverty concentration;
  • Percent plans that guarantee admission to top graduates from each high school across a state;
  • Reducing reliance on standardized test scores;
  • Using zip-codes as a factor in admissions;
  • Addressing undermatch, not just at elite colleges, but across the full range of four year institutions; and
  • Establishing a national database of admissible students to help colleges recruit representative cohorts.

To access the full report visit: http://apps.tcf.org/future-of-affirmative-action

To watch the live webcast of today’s Lumina Ideas Summit where The Future of Affirmative Action will be launched visit: http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/fisher_summit.html

For more information or to speak with any of the contributors featured in the volume contact:

Lucia Anderson Weathers
Lumina Foundation
317-951-5316
landerson@luminafoundation.org

         

Lucy Muirhead
The Century Foundation
917-244-4213
muirhead@tcf.org


Full list of contributors:

  • Editor: Richard D. Kahlenberg, Senior Fellow, The Century Foundation
  • Danielle Allen, UPS Foundation Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.
  • John Brittain, Professor of Law University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke School of Law.
  • Nancy Cantor, Chancellor, Rutgers University-Newark.
  • Anthony P. Carnevale, Director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.
  • Dalton Conley, University Professor at New York University.
  • Arthur L. Coleman, Co-founder and co-managing partner of EducationCounsel LLC.
  • Peter Englot, Senior Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs and Chief of Staff at Rutgers University-Newark.
  • Matthew N. Gaertner, Senior Research Scientist at the Center for College and Career Success at Pearson.
  • Sara Goldrick-Rab, Associate Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Scott Greytak, Associate with Campinha Bacote LLC.
  • Catharine Hill, President of Vassar College
  • Jessica Howell, Economist and Executive Director of Policy Research at the College Board.
  • Benjamin Landy, homepage editor at MSNBC and former Policy Associate at The Century Foundation.
  • Richard L. McCormick, President Emeritus and Professor of History and Education at Rutgers.
  • Nancy McDuff, Director of Admissions, University of Georgia.
  • Halley Potter, Policy Associate, The Century Foundation.
  • Alexandria Walton Radford, Director of the Transition to College Program at RTI International.
  • Stephen J. Rose, Senior Economist at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.
  • Richard Sander, Economist and Law Professor at UCLA’s School of Law.
  • Jeff Strohl, Director of Research at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.
  • Teresa Taylor, Policy and Legal Advisor, EducationCounsel LLC.
  • Marta Tienda, Maurice P. During ‘22 Professor of Demographic Studies and Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University.

Contacts

Lumina Foundation
Lucia Anderson Weathers, 317-951-5316
landerson@luminafoundation.org
or
The Century Foundation
Lucy Muirhead, 917-244-4213
muirhead@tcf.org

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http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/news_releases/2014-06-17.html/feed/ 0 Lumina Foundation’s Equity Imperative http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Equity_Imperative.pdf http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Equity_Imperative.pdf#comments Mon, 16 Jun 2014 20:35:50 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22479 Read why equity matters »]]> Read why equity matters »]]> http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Equity_Imperative.pdf/feed/ 0 Reflections on Lumina’s History, and Its Future http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-11.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-11.html#comments Wed, 11 Jun 2014 22:10:44 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22450 More »]]> Jamie P. Merisotis

Every once in a while, Lumina Foundation is asked—and occasionally even confronted, as was the case in a recent article in an online media outlet—about its history as a foundation whose assets came from a student loan transaction. Rather than leave it to others to try to characterize, I’d like to explain in my own words what Lumina Foundation is, and what we care about as a national foundation.

Lumina Foundation was formed in 2000 when USA Group sold its operating assets to Sallie Mae. Lumina’s current 12-member board of directors includes three former Sallie Mae board members. None of those board members has had any connection to the student loan industry for more than a decade. Lumina’s board is a distinguished and diverse group that includes former college presidents, business leaders and nationally-recognized leaders with significant public policy experience. No member of the Lumina staff, including myself, has ties to the student loan industry.

As CEO, I’m best known for my history as founder and CEO of an independent, nonpartisan think tank in Washington, DC, the Institute for Higher Education Policy, and for my work leading a bipartisan national commission that produced a report in 1993 that proposed, among other things, the replacement of the bank-based federal student loan program in favor of a direct student loan system. I consider myself ferociously independent from a political perspective. What I care about most is helping the country dramatically increase high-quality postsecondary educational attainment to benefit our collective well-being—economically, socially and culturally.

The Foundation has been an independent, non-partisan organization since its formation. Most of our grantees and partners do not work in the public policy realm and have no particular ideological or political perspective. They care about increasing postsecondary attainment, like we do. Many of them disagree with each other—something we think is important in helping to shape the best possible strategies. Examples of recent partners with a more federal policy-focused orientation run the gamut of perspectives and include the Center for American Progress, Young Invincibles, Brookings Institution, New America Foundation, and American Enterprise Institute, to name just a few.

The present and future for Lumina is singularly focused on Goal 2025, which is our commitment to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. We undertake our work in a transparent fashion and our stated views on creating a student-centered, learning-focused system of higher education are all available on our web site at www.luminafoundation.org.

We believe that all Americans deserve access to a high-quality, affordable postsecondary education that can help them meet their goals, including a good job and a good life. Student loans occupy a fairly small part of what we have thought about as an organization, though, like many others, we have sought to find ways to address the growing levels of student debt that have become a major challenge for society. We are concerned that excessive debt adversely influences what careers people choose and whether to start a family, own a house, or run a business.

From the vantage point of federal policy, that means federal student aid programs should ensure access to higher education for the large numbers of low-income, first generation and minority students who have not been well-served, while also providing incentives to complete programs in a more transparent, predictable manner. It’s also clear that colleges and universities must fundamentally rethink the way they deliver education. This means supporting both institutional practice and public policy that aims to serve more students better—speeding up time to degree, limiting student borrowing, engaging faculty in the rapid changes taking place in higher education, and supporting competency-based learning models, among other approaches.

We support innovation in higher education, and we solicit and help to advance the best ideas from a wide range of sources across the spectrum. This represents a change in philanthropy that’s garnering some attention. You see, we believe that philanthropic organizations—like Lumina—exist for one reason: to use the assets we hold in trust to act as society’s risk-takers. Our only bottom line is to ensure social progress—a daunting charge, but one that should inspire fortitude and foster real leadership.

It shouldn’t be lost on anyone that America is demanding this approach. According to a recent Gallup/Lumina poll, 89 percent of Americans say that higher education institutions need to change to better serve today’s students. Policymakers in a growing number of states are enacting outcomes-based funding formulas, tying higher education funding not to mere enrollment of students, but to the success of those students. Other states and systems are experimenting with innovative ways to provide financial aid to low-income students; they’re also exploring ways to reduce remediation, accelerate student progress and increase attainment for all types of students.

People who see a connection between Lumina and the student loan industry are looking back on a history that is long past. Our current work and future focus are aimed at ensuring that many more students can get into and through postsecondary learning environments, armed with skills and knowledge that will make them productive at work, and happier and more successful as citizens, family members and community leaders. That’s what Lumina Foundation is about, now and for as long as I am privileged to serve as its CEO.

Jamie Merisotis is president and CEO of Lumina Foundation.

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Thirty-five communities added to Lumina Foundation’s community-based postsecondary education attainment strategy http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-05.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-05.html#comments Thu, 05 Jun 2014 04:02:36 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22358 More »]]>
INDIANAPOLIS
– Today, 35 new U.S. communities were announced in the second cohort of Lumina Foundation’s community-based postsecondary education attainment strategy. The strategy was designed to help communities and regions dramatically increase the number of local residents with postsecondary credentials. The collaborative effort connects participating cities with significant technical and planning assistance, data tools, flexible funding, and the ability to customize attainment plans that will best suit each community’s needs and the well-being of its residents.

“Research shows a direct correlation between thriving cities and education beyond high school,” said Jamie Merisotis, Lumina’s president and CEO. “Increased attainment delivers stronger local economies, greater individual earning power and better quality of life. Every community in America wants that, and we’ve designed this work to give civic leaders the tools they need to be successful.”

Video: Lumina Initiative Gives Community Leaders Support to Deepen Local Efforts

Lumina’s goal for this work is to mobilize all sectors in a community to improve postsecondary attainment. Communities will partner with Lumina and national thought leaders through 2016 to establish attainment goals. Organizations will work with national partners to develop an action plan focused on reaching the attainment goal to increase the percentage of high-quality credentials held by community residents.

Progress toward the goal will be measured by credentials earned after high school, including certificates, associate degrees and bachelor’s degrees held by local residents. The cities selected have already demonstrated momentum in advancing attainment agendas, and this effort aims to expand and deepen their work.

“It is our intention that Lumina’s support will bolster the great work already being done in our Partnership cities, improving results there and showing cities across the country just how transformational education can be for communities’ social, economic and civic strength,” said Haley Glover, strategy director at Lumina Foundation overseeing this work.

The overall effort connects to Goal 2025, a national goal to increase the percentage of Americans with high-quality degrees and credentials to 60 percent by the year 2025. Lumina’s partners in this effort will provide guidance to the cities as they develop goals and action plans. The national thought-leadership organizations that communities will have access to through this work include: the American Chamber of Commerce Executives, the Brookings Institution, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, DCA Inc., Excelencia in Education, the Institute for Higher Education Policy, the Michigan College Access Network, the National College Access Network, the National League of Cities, the OMG Center, the Say Yes to Education Foundation, and Strive Together.

“We are pleased to partner with Lumina Foundation to raise educational attainment in communities across the country,” said Clifford M. Johnson, executive director of the Institute for Youth, Education, and Families at the National League of Cities. “Mayors and other city leaders know that by collaborating across sectors to boost college completion rates, they are helping to boost the economic development of the city, and the quality of life and well-being of their neighborhoods and families.”

The second cohort of communities includes: Akron, Ohio; Albany, N.Y.; Austin, Texas; Berkeley, Calif.; Chicago, Ill.; Cleveland, Ohio; Coachella Valley, Calif.; Columbia, S.C.; Corpus Christi, Texas; Dallas, Texas; Denver, Colo.; Detroit, Mich.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Hartford, Conn.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Kansas City, Mo.; Las Vegas, Nev.; Los Angeles, Calif.; Milwaukee, Wis.; Nashville, Tenn.; New Hampshire Region; New York, N.Y.; Newark, N.J.; Northwest Indiana Region; Orlando, Fla.; Phoenix, Ariz.; Portland, Ore.; Richmond, Va.; Rio Grande Valley Region; Salt Lake City, Utah; Savannah, Ga.; Spokane, Wash.; Southwest Florida Region; Washington, D.C., and Winston-Salem, N.C.

Contacts
Second cohort
City/RegionCommunications/PREmail
Akron/Summit, OHDerren Wimerdwimer@seisummit.org
Albany, NYDavid DoyleDavid.Doyle@suny.edu
Austin, TXJessica Meltonjmelton@austinchamber.com
Berkeley, CAMatthai Chakkomchakko@cityofberkeley.info
Chicago, IL Elizabeth Swansonswanson@cityofchicago.org
Cleveland, OHElizabeth Dayeday@collegenowgc.org
Coachella Valley, CABeth Allan-Bentleybeth@cvep.com
Columbia, SCTonia Cochrantonia@yourfoundation.org
Corpus Christi, TXClaudia Jacksoncjackson@delmar.edu
Dallas, TXTarik Wardtarik.ward@commit2dallas.org
Denver, CO Dana Smithdsmith@denverscholarship.org
Detroit, MINicole de Beaufortndebeaufort@excellentschoolsdetroit.org
Grand Rapids, MILynn Heemstralheemstra@grcity.us
Hartford, CTMary Crean mcrean@achievehartford.org
Jacksonville, FLMatt Galnormatt.galnor@myjaxchamber.com
Kansas City, MOBarbara Hensleybhensley@marc.org
Las Vegas, NVVanessa Maniagovanessam@uwsn.org
Los Angeles, CAAni Okkasianaokkasian@lachamber.com
Milwaukee, WIDanya Straitdstrait@gmconline.org
Nashville, TNMichele Lacewellmlacewell@nashvillechamber.com
National Capital Region, DC & Surrounding areaJenny Townsjtowns@cfncr.org
New Hampshire RegionKristen Oliveriks@nhcf.org
New York City, NYLisa Castillo Richmondlisa.castillorichmond@cuny.edu
Newark, NJDr. Roland V. Anglinr.anglin@rutgers.edu
Northwest Indiana RegionBarbara GrimsgardBgrimsgard@innovativeworkforce.com
Orlando, FLAshley BlasewitzAshley.Blasewitz@hfuw.org
Phoenix, AZMary Lou Valenzuelamvalenzuela@vsuw.org
Portland, ORJeanie-Marie PriceJeanie-marie@allhandsraised.org
Richmond, VAJonathan Orrjjorr@vcu.edu
Rio Grande Valley, TXGeorge Tanggtang@cftexas.org
Salt Lake City, UTKaren Halekaren.hale@slcgov.com
Savannah, GABrenda Forbisbrenda.forbis@armstrong.edu
Spokane, WAJanice Marichjanicem@unitedwayspokane.org
Southwest Florida RegionCarolyn Rogerscrogers@floridacommunity.com
Winston-Salem, NCMary Cranfillmary.cranfill@uwforsyth.org

“Education is the key force behind prosperity,” said David Rattray, senior vice president of Education & Workforce Development at the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce and President of UNITE-LA. “We in Los Angeles are very excited to be a part of this national effort, not only to leverage the resources and expertise the Partnership provides, but to share what we know with other communities working on the same challenges.”

Lumina plans to invest approximately $5.6 million into the second cohort and over $13 million directly to communities over the course of the program. Each community will be eligible for an allocation of $160,000 over a 2.5-year period, which will be tied to achievement of goals.


About Lumina Foundation:  Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Lumina’s outcomes-based approach focuses on helping to design and build an accessible, responsive and accountable higher education system while fostering a national sense of urgency for action to achieve Goal 2025.

Media contact:

Lucia Anderson Weathers
Lumina Foundation
317.951.5316
landerson@luminafoundation.org

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Lumina Foundation Launches Challenge to Bridge the Gap between Education and Business http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-05-economist_challenge.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-05-economist_challenge.html#comments Thu, 05 Jun 2014 04:01:59 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22363 The Economist Group and InnoCentive, has launched a new crowdsourcing challenge which will generate solutions to closing the skills gap and increasing communication between higher education and today’s workforce. More »]]> Challenge winner to receive $10,000 and one on one coaching from leaders of industry

New York (June 4, 2014)—Lumina Foundation, in partnership with The Economist Group and InnoCentive, has launched a new crowdsourcing challenge which will generate solutions to closing the skills gap and increasing communication between higher education and today’s workforce.

Open to the public, the Challenge seeks to create a product or service that will facilitate communication between employers and higher education in order to better teach skills that are relevant and necessary for today’s workforce.

“Today’s employers want to hire graduates with a broad array of knowledge and skills—not just specific content knowledge, but transferable skills like critical thinking, the ability to solve unscripted problems, and to communicate effectively,” said Jamie Merisotis, Lumina’s president and CEO. “Higher education and employers must work together to prepare students for real-world success.”

The Economist Intelligence Unit’s newly released report “ Closing the skills gap: Companies and colleges collaborating for change,” sponsored by Lumina Foundation, highlights the skills that employers feel are lacking in recent graduates. The study reveals that employers want graduates with strong “soft skills” such as the ability to communicate and collaborate at a high level, ranking these “soft skills” as the most important workplace skills for employees to possess when joining a company.

Companies and colleges collaborating for change

Closing the skills gap

30 pgs. | 1M | PDF

Key findings include

Semi-finalists of the Challenge will receive coaching from both a VC and Communications expert as well as a chance to compete on the main-stage at The Economist Higher Education Forum 2014. The winner will receive a monetary prize of $10,000. Submissions for the challenge will be open from June 4—July 25, 2014. Further information on the challenge and submission guidelines can be found here.

Join the conversation and connect with attendees and speakers on Twitter via  #Skillsgapchallenge


About Lumina

Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Lumina’s outcomes-based approach focuses on helping to design and build an accessible, responsive and accountable higher education system while fostering a national sense of urgency for action to achieve Goal 2025.

About The Economist Group

The Economist Group is the leading source of analysis on international business and world affairs. We deliver our information through a range of formats, from newspapers and magazines to conferences and electronic services. What ties us together is the objectivity of our opinion, the originality of our insight and our advocacy of economic and political freedom around the world.

About InnoCentive

InnoCentive is the global leader in crowdsourcing innovation problems to the world’s smartest people who compete to provide ideas and solutions to important business, social, policy, scientific and technical challenges. Our global network of millions of problem solvers, proven challenge methodology and cloud-based innovation management platform combine to help our clients transform their economics of innovation through rapid solution delivery and the development of sustainable open innovation programs.

Follow the conversation

@Economist_innov
https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist

Contact:

Havas PR
Kevin Maloney
+1 (646) 441-8128
Kevin.Maloney@Havasww.com

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College Unbound – Lumina Foundation ChallengeScaling and Sustaining Adult Learning http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-03-adult_learning_challenge.html http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/2014-06-03-adult_learning_challenge.html#comments Tue, 03 Jun 2014 14:16:15 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22326 More »]]> Unbound Philanthropy
Dr. Suarez receiving the “Unbound Philanthropy” award on behalf of Lumina at their 2014 class graduation ceremony

Adult learners are a growing part of the non-traditional student population seeking a college degree. Many of these individuals have significant responsibilities beyond college assignments and they need a flexible learning environment that is emotionally and financially supportive. Equally important to adults is relevant, interest-based curriculum. College Unbound is a high-touch delivery model designed for adults, providing the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. The goal is to create an online innovation with on ground application and support that builds upon the cornerstones of the current curriculum and increases the accessibility and sustainability of the program.

This is an Ideation Challenge with a guaranteed award for at least one submitted solution. More »

College Unbound has a track record of helping returning adults complete a bachelor’s degree while working in real life projects. The CU team have developed an innovative model that could well represent the future for adult learners. Kiko Suarez, Lumina’s vice president of communications and innovation

Related:
College Unbound was featured in the Summer 2012 issue of Lumina Foundation Focus magazine.


Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Lumina’s outcomes-based approach focuses on helping to design and build an accessible, responsive and accountable higher education system while fostering a national sense of urgency for action to achieve Goal 2025.

InnoCentive is the global leader in crowdsourcing innovation problems to the world’s smartest people who compete to provide ideas and solutions to important business, social, policy, scientific, and technical challenges. For more than a decade, leading commercial, government, and nonprofit organizations have partnered with InnoCentive to rapidly generate innovative new ideas and solve pressing problems. For more information, visit www.innocentive.com.

College Unbound helps students of all ages earn an accredited bachelor’s degree that is tailored to their personal interests and needs. Nearly 75% of today’s college students are non-traditional. Unlike students matriculating directly from high school, these people have additional roles and responsibilities that have a direct impact on their time, finances, and flexibility. College Unbound helps these adults to earn degrees through interest-based action research projects in the workplace or in their community. The goal is to create a higher education innovation that integrates the online environment to increase the accessibility and sustainability of the current program.

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Leadership Model of Philanthropy http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Leadership.Model.of.Philanthropy.pdf http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Leadership.Model.of.Philanthropy.pdf#comments Tue, 27 May 2014 14:21:15 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22261 leadership model of philanthropy, in favor of following a strictly charitable role. Merisotis shares his thoughts on how that leadership model can lead to more significant and lasting change that will "permanently alter the conditions that make assistance necessary." Read more »]]> leadership model of philanthropy, in favor of following a strictly charitable role. Merisotis shares his thoughts on how that leadership model can lead to more significant and lasting change that will "permanently alter the conditions that make assistance necessary." Read more »]]> http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Leadership.Model.of.Philanthropy.pdf/feed/ 0 Federal Policy Priorities http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/federal_policy_priorities/ http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/federal_policy_priorities/#comments Thu, 22 May 2014 13:39:39 +0000 matthew http://www.luminafoundation.org/?p=22230 Read now »]]> Read now »]]> http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/federal_policy_priorities/feed/ 0