Why is the educational attainment rate important
to America's future?

The United States risks an unprecedented shortage of college-educated workers in coming years. With the global economy demanding more and more highly skilled workers, economists and labor experts say increasing college attainment is a national imperative.

That’s why Lumina is part of a growing movement to increase the higher education attainment rate of the United States to 60 percent by the year 2025. We must work harder—and faster—to reach this Big Goal. Increasing the nation’s college attainment rate is critical if we hope to sustain the vitality of our local communities and the nation’s economy.

The Big Goal

Increase the proportion of Americans with high-quality college degrees and credentials to 60% by 2025.

Read the Strategic Plan »

Levels of Education

FOR THE U.S. 2010 | AGE 25-64

◼ THE QUICK BREAKDOWN

Graduate or professional degree
10.70%
17,527,995
Bachelor's degree
19.18%
31,423,077
Associate degree
8.44%
13,832,109

Some college, no degree
22.10%
36,209,776
High school graduate (including equivalency)
27.07%
44,350,497
Ninth to 12th grade, no diploma
7.65%
12,539,457
Less than ninth grade
4.87%
7,972,497

Adults With College Degrees

FOR THE U.S. 2010 | AGE 25-64

◼ THE QUICK BREAKDOWN

38.32%

Adults with college
degrees (2010):

Of the 38.32% of American adults with college degrees, this is the breakdown by various ethnic groups.

The Path to 60% Degree Attainment in the U.S.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey

 

Texas Washington Oregon California Nevada Arizona Idaho Utah Wyoming Montana Colorado New Mexico Alaska Hawaii North Dakota South Dakota Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma Louisiana Arkansas Missouri Iowa Minnesota Wisconsin Michigan Illinois Indiana Ohio Kentucky Tennessee Mississippi Alabama Florida Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Virginia West Virginia Maryland Pennsylvania New York Delaware New Jersey Connecticut Rhode Island Massachusetts Vermont New Hampshire Maine Pennsylvania New York Vermont New Hampshire Maryland

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