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Whether and where to pursue a college degree involves several often-competing considerations, and the importance placed on each factor varies across individuals. Layered upon these highly individualized decisions are state-level policies that impact students’ on-campus experience.

A Lumina Foundation and Gallup survey of roughly 14,000 U.S. adults without a college degree — including nearly 7,000 adults who are considering or currently pursuing a two- or four-year degree — finds that while these legislative considerations are generally less influential than those related to cost, flexibility, and quality of education, they are an important factor for most current and prospective students.

Between 70% and 80% of adults who are considering or currently pursuing a two- or four-year degree say policies related to reproductive healthcare, guns, and restrictions of curriculum are at least somewhat important to their decision whether to enroll or remain enrolled in a program.

Download the report to discover how major policy shifts factor into students’ enrollment decisions and whether students prefer to attend colleges in states with more or less restrictive policies in these areas.


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