Top stories in higher ed for Thursday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
January 24, 2019
Embracing Education on the Inside
Vicki Ritterband, Jobs for the Future
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It's about a 40-minute drive from Barton Community College to each of the two correctional facilities it serves. The issue is more than geography. Barton's mission is to decrease the distance of expectation between a college education and its incarcerated residents. 

There is a growing consensus (and the research to back it up) that post-incarceration employment dramatically decreases recidivism. After a new warden took the reins at Ellsworth Correctional Facility in 2003, he asked Barton Community College’s Correctional Education Services to provide education programs that would lead to certifications and diplomas and improve inmates’ prospects for jobs upon release. Barton’s Building Academic Skills in Correctional Settings (BASICS) program has since transitioned into a one of the most successful correctional education programs in the nation.

Ladders to Success
Doug Chayka, POLITICO
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America is built on the promise of opportunity—a society in which no matter who your parents are or where they came from, you can build a prosperous life for yourself and your children. And education, especially higher education, has long been seen as the primary ladder to that prosperity.

Today, however, observers both inside and outside America’s higher education establishment have begun to ask whether a system more than two centuries old is the best fit for an economy whose skills and demands change at the pace of modern technology.

Unusual New Program Seeks to Cut Urban Crime by Pushing Gang Members Into College
Kelly Field, The Hechinger Report
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Matt Jackson grew up surrounded by drugs and violence in Boston's South End neighborhood. Locked up at 14 for possessing crack cocaine, he spent what might have been his college years in prison. When Jackson's girlfriend was killed in gang crossfire in 2014, he became a single father to a toddler. He knew it was time to do something different with his life. 

Now 35, Jackson is creating a better future for himself and his child though a program called Boston Uncornered. The effort seeks out former gang members, offering them free college prep, mentors, and stipends under the theory that, once armed with a college degree, they'll go from negative to positive role models in their communities.

Want to Learn How the World Sees Your College? Look on YouTube
Terry Nguyen, The Chronicle of Higher Education
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Nicolas Chae's morning routine as a sophomore at Princeton University entails carrying a camera wherever he goes. He does so to gather footage of his daily interactions, which he then broadcasts to thousands of people many times a month.

Chae is a YouTube influencer, a video creator who has gained recognition via his vlogs, or video blogs, about everyday life. His channel is part of a niche digital community on YouTube where students upload videos documenting the college experience. The content includes information on their dorms, academics, study habits, exams, and more. 

Videos uploaded by college students offer an authentic lens into student life and campus culture, which are helpful for high schoolers looking to visualize themselves on a specific campus.

First Stop on a Workforce Road Map
James Folmer, Highland Community News
West Virginia Senate Downs Two Amendments to 'Last Dollar In' CTC Bill
Dave Mistich, West Virginia Public Broadcasting
Connecting Talent With Opportunity
Scott Ralls, Community College Daily
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Top stories in higher ed for Thursday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
January 24, 2019
Embracing Education on the Inside
Vicki Ritterband, Jobs for the Future
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

It's about a 40-minute drive from Barton Community College to each of the two correctional facilities it serves. The issue is more than geography. Barton's mission is to decrease the distance of expectation between a college education and its incarcerated residents. 

There is a growing consensus (and the research to back it up) that post-incarceration employment dramatically decreases recidivism. After a new warden took the reins at Ellsworth Correctional Facility in 2003, he asked Barton Community College’s Correctional Education Services to provide education programs that would lead to certifications and diplomas and improve inmates’ prospects for jobs upon release. Barton’s Building Academic Skills in Correctional Settings (BASICS) program has since transitioned into a one of the most successful correctional education programs in the nation.

Ladders to Success
Doug Chayka, POLITICO
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

America is built on the promise of opportunity—a society in which no matter who your parents are or where they came from, you can build a prosperous life for yourself and your children. And education, especially higher education, has long been seen as the primary ladder to that prosperity.

Today, however, observers both inside and outside America’s higher education establishment have begun to ask whether a system more than two centuries old is the best fit for an economy whose skills and demands change at the pace of modern technology.

Unusual New Program Seeks to Cut Urban Crime by Pushing Gang Members Into College
Kelly Field, The Hechinger Report
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Matt Jackson grew up surrounded by drugs and violence in Boston's South End neighborhood. Locked up at 14 for possessing crack cocaine, he spent what might have been his college years in prison. When Jackson's girlfriend was killed in gang crossfire in 2014, he became a single father to a toddler. He knew it was time to do something different with his life. 

Now 35, Jackson is creating a better future for himself and his child though a program called Boston Uncornered. The effort seeks out former gang members, offering them free college prep, mentors, and stipends under the theory that, once armed with a college degree, they'll go from negative to positive role models in their communities.

Want to Learn How the World Sees Your College? Look on YouTube
Terry Nguyen, The Chronicle of Higher Education
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Nicolas Chae's morning routine as a sophomore at Princeton University entails carrying a camera wherever he goes. He does so to gather footage of his daily interactions, which he then broadcasts to thousands of people many times a month.

Chae is a YouTube influencer, a video creator who has gained recognition via his vlogs, or video blogs, about everyday life. His channel is part of a niche digital community on YouTube where students upload videos documenting the college experience. The content includes information on their dorms, academics, study habits, exams, and more. 

Videos uploaded by college students offer an authentic lens into student life and campus culture, which are helpful for high schoolers looking to visualize themselves on a specific campus.

First Stop on a Workforce Road Map
James Folmer, Highland Community News
West Virginia Senate Downs Two Amendments to 'Last Dollar In' CTC Bill
Dave Mistich, West Virginia Public Broadcasting
Connecting Talent With Opportunity
Scott Ralls, Community College Daily
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