Top stories in higher ed for Friday
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Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
June 1, 2018
We Hope Walmart’s New Education Program Inspires Other Employers to Take Action
Jamie Merisotis, Medium
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Walmart's new employee education and training program will not only give more workers access to a college education, but also provide workers with knowledge and skills for informed citizenship and success in a global economy.  

One exciting aspect of Walmart's program is its emphasis on making work-based training eligible for college credit through its Academies. A quarter of a million workers have moved through the existing Walmart Academies program, making it one of the nation's largest employer-supported training programs. These workers gain the knowledge and skills they need to become better associates and managers in areas such as sales, management, and merchandising.

Back-to-School Initiative Earns National Nod as 'Detroit Talent Hub'
Sherri Welch, Crain's Detroit Business
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The Detroit Regional Chamber, Wayne State University, and Macomb Community College are collaborating on efforts to re-engage people in the region to complete college degrees or postsecondary certifications.

Earlier this week, Lumina Foundation and The Kresge Foundation designated Detroit as one of 24 "Talent Hubs" across the country. The designation signifies cities have the capacity and ability to significantly increase the number of residents with college degrees, certificates, or other credentials beyond a high school diploma. The designation comes with standards for creating environments that attract, retain, and cultivate talent, particularly among today's students, many of whom are people of color, the first in their families to go to college and from low-income households

Mixed Signals From Adults Mulling a College Degree
Community College Daily
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Adults without a degree who are thinking of going to college seem to understand the value of furthering their education, as well as the potential challenges along the way, according to a new report from Public Agenda.

The report highlights ways schools and policymakers can help more adult learners access college, stay on track, and graduate. This includes providing guidance about when to transfer, creating structures to help undecided adult prospective students pick a program of study prior to enrollment, and offering workplace-relevant instruction in classrooms.

How Colorado Is Betting on Counseling to Vault Low-Income Kids Into Good Jobs and Postsecondary Education
Sarah Gonser, The Hechinger Report
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Mariano Almanza was overwhelmed. With an English paper due at the end of the week, an anatomy packet to complete, and an ever-growing pile of math assignments, the 18-year-old was at a breaking point. He went straight to Miss Mack for help. 

Miss Mack, as she is known to students at Coronado High School, is Colleen McElvogue, one of the school’s six counselors and the chairperson of its counseling department. Colorado is betting that a big investment in counseling can improve educational outcomes for low-income students.

So far, the results are promising. As of 2016, graduation rates among participating schools had risen from 65 percent to nearly 80 percent, while dropout rates declined. Enrollment in high school career-and-technical programs doubled. Completion rates for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid increased to 54 percent, compared to 48 percent for the state, and the share of students taking college-level courses grew to 74 percent, compared to 48 percent at non-funded schools.

Five Interesting Things About Walmart’s New (Nearly) Free College Benefit
Goldie Blumenstyk, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Can Blockchain Reinvent the College Enterprise?
Jarrett Carter, Education Dive
Nonprofit Winning Futures to Launch Career-Readiness Program
Sherri Welch, Crain's Detroit Business
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This email was sent to jenkins2541@gmail.com.

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Lumina Foundation
30 S. Meridian St., Ste. 700
Indianapolis, IN 46204

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Top stories in higher ed for Friday
To view this email as a web page, click here.
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
June 1, 2018
We Hope Walmart’s New Education Program Inspires Other Employers to Take Action
Jamie Merisotis, Medium
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Walmart's new employee education and training program will not only give more workers access to a college education, but also provide workers with knowledge and skills for informed citizenship and success in a global economy.  

One exciting aspect of Walmart's program is its emphasis on making work-based training eligible for college credit through its Academies. A quarter of a million workers have moved through the existing Walmart Academies program, making it one of the nation's largest employer-supported training programs. These workers gain the knowledge and skills they need to become better associates and managers in areas such as sales, management, and merchandising.

Back-to-School Initiative Earns National Nod as 'Detroit Talent Hub'
Sherri Welch, Crain's Detroit Business
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

The Detroit Regional Chamber, Wayne State University, and Macomb Community College are collaborating on efforts to re-engage people in the region to complete college degrees or postsecondary certifications.

Earlier this week, Lumina Foundation and The Kresge Foundation designated Detroit as one of 24 "Talent Hubs" across the country. The designation signifies cities have the capacity and ability to significantly increase the number of residents with college degrees, certificates, or other credentials beyond a high school diploma. The designation comes with standards for creating environments that attract, retain, and cultivate talent, particularly among today's students, many of whom are people of color, the first in their families to go to college and from low-income households

Mixed Signals From Adults Mulling a College Degree
Community College Daily
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Adults without a degree who are thinking of going to college seem to understand the value of furthering their education, as well as the potential challenges along the way, according to a new report from Public Agenda.

The report highlights ways schools and policymakers can help more adult learners access college, stay on track, and graduate. This includes providing guidance about when to transfer, creating structures to help undecided adult prospective students pick a program of study prior to enrollment, and offering workplace-relevant instruction in classrooms.

How Colorado Is Betting on Counseling to Vault Low-Income Kids Into Good Jobs and Postsecondary Education
Sarah Gonser, The Hechinger Report
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Mariano Almanza was overwhelmed. With an English paper due at the end of the week, an anatomy packet to complete, and an ever-growing pile of math assignments, the 18-year-old was at a breaking point. He went straight to Miss Mack for help. 

Miss Mack, as she is known to students at Coronado High School, is Colleen McElvogue, one of the school’s six counselors and the chairperson of its counseling department. Colorado is betting that a big investment in counseling can improve educational outcomes for low-income students.

So far, the results are promising. As of 2016, graduation rates among participating schools had risen from 65 percent to nearly 80 percent, while dropout rates declined. Enrollment in high school career-and-technical programs doubled. Completion rates for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid increased to 54 percent, compared to 48 percent for the state, and the share of students taking college-level courses grew to 74 percent, compared to 48 percent at non-funded schools.

Five Interesting Things About Walmart’s New (Nearly) Free College Benefit
Goldie Blumenstyk, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Can Blockchain Reinvent the College Enterprise?
Jarrett Carter, Education Dive
Nonprofit Winning Futures to Launch Career-Readiness Program
Sherri Welch, Crain's Detroit Business
Facebook Twitter


This email was sent to jenkins2541@gmail.com.

This email was sent by:
Lumina Foundation
30 S. Meridian St., Ste. 700
Indianapolis, IN 46204

Update Profile | Unsubscribe



Top stories in higher ed for Friday
To view this email as a web page, click here.
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
June 1, 2018
We Hope Walmart’s New Education Program Inspires Other Employers to Take Action
Jamie Merisotis, Medium
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Walmart's new employee education and training program will not only give more workers access to a college education, but also provide workers with knowledge and skills for informed citizenship and success in a global economy.  

One exciting aspect of Walmart's program is its emphasis on making work-based training eligible for college credit through its Academies. A quarter of a million workers have moved through the existing Walmart Academies program, making it one of the nation's largest employer-supported training programs. These workers gain the knowledge and skills they need to become better associates and managers in areas such as sales, management, and merchandising.

Back-to-School Initiative Earns National Nod as 'Detroit Talent Hub'
Sherri Welch, Crain's Detroit Business
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

The Detroit Regional Chamber, Wayne State University, and Macomb Community College are collaborating on efforts to re-engage people in the region to complete college degrees or postsecondary certifications.

Earlier this week, Lumina Foundation and The Kresge Foundation designated Detroit as one of 24 "Talent Hubs" across the country. The designation signifies cities have the capacity and ability to significantly increase the number of residents with college degrees, certificates, or other credentials beyond a high school diploma. The designation comes with standards for creating environments that attract, retain, and cultivate talent, particularly among today's students, many of whom are people of color, the first in their families to go to college and from low-income households

Mixed Signals From Adults Mulling a College Degree
Community College Daily
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Adults without a degree who are thinking of going to college seem to understand the value of furthering their education, as well as the potential challenges along the way, according to a new report from Public Agenda.

The report highlights ways schools and policymakers can help more adult learners access college, stay on track, and graduate. This includes providing guidance about when to transfer, creating structures to help undecided adult prospective students pick a program of study prior to enrollment, and offering workplace-relevant instruction in classrooms.

How Colorado Is Betting on Counseling to Vault Low-Income Kids Into Good Jobs and Postsecondary Education
Sarah Gonser, The Hechinger Report
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Mariano Almanza was overwhelmed. With an English paper due at the end of the week, an anatomy packet to complete, and an ever-growing pile of math assignments, the 18-year-old was at a breaking point. He went straight to Miss Mack for help. 

Miss Mack, as she is known to students at Coronado High School, is Colleen McElvogue, one of the school’s six counselors and the chairperson of its counseling department. Colorado is betting that a big investment in counseling can improve educational outcomes for low-income students.

So far, the results are promising. As of 2016, graduation rates among participating schools had risen from 65 percent to nearly 80 percent, while dropout rates declined. Enrollment in high school career-and-technical programs doubled. Completion rates for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid increased to 54 percent, compared to 48 percent for the state, and the share of students taking college-level courses grew to 74 percent, compared to 48 percent at non-funded schools.

Five Interesting Things About Walmart’s New (Nearly) Free College Benefit
Goldie Blumenstyk, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Can Blockchain Reinvent the College Enterprise?
Jarrett Carter, Education Dive
Nonprofit Winning Futures to Launch Career-Readiness Program
Sherri Welch, Crain's Detroit Business
Facebook Twitter


This email was sent to jenkins2541@gmail.com.

This email was sent by:
Lumina Foundation
30 S. Meridian St., Ste. 700
Indianapolis, IN 46204

Update Profile | Unsubscribe