Top stories in higher ed for Monday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
June 11, 2018
Why Do So Many Students Drop Out of College? And What Can Be Done About It?
Jeffrey J. Selingo, The Washington Post
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With the pressure on colleges to retain more students and get them to graduation, campuses are spending an increasing share of their budgets on student-success efforts. They are installing technology that constantly tracks performance, hiring professional advising staffs to assist in course selection, and designing opportunities on and off campus to better engage students in their undergraduate careers.

Now, there is a greater sense of urgency to these activities. A surge in enrollment of first-generation, low-income, and minority students is expected in the coming years—all groups historically not well-served by higher education.

Playbook of Pairing Education and Automation Makes Employers and Workers More Resilient in the Future of Work
Van Ton-Quinlivan, California Economy Reporting
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When employers co-invest in educating and training their employees, they not only help remove financial barriers to a college education, but their company reaps benefits, as well.

Employees who receive educational benefits are more likely to be retained longer, be promoted, or make a lateral move within the company. These same employees also tend to have fewer unexcused absences and be more engaged on the job.
Housing Costs—More Than Tuition—Are Crushing California’s Low-Income College Students
Vanessa Rancaño, KQED
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When Sadia Kahn was accepted to UC Berkeley, she struggled to find affordable housing as a student-parent. She's not alone.

Attending a university in California can be a financial burden beyond the means of many college hopefuls. Rising tuition is compounded by the lack of affordable housing in the state and the high cost of living.  

In a New Land, Another Barrier
Meredith Kolodner, The Hechinger Report/The New York Times
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Estrella Rivas is one of more than 690,000 young people brought to this country illegally as children and temporarily granted the right to stay under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. 

Now many DACA recipients, including Rivas, are ready for college. But the price can be prohibitive. Rivas is fortunate. She will attend Rutgers University with help from a New Jersey program that allows DACA recipients to receive the same state financial aid as other residents.
A Good Time to Head to the Hill
David Baime, Community College Daily
Study: Boys’ Interest in STEM Careers Declining
Tala Salem, U.S. News & World Report
Healing a Divided Economy
Heather Boerner, Community College Daily
Opinion: What Equal Opportunity in Education Really Means
Deborah Beck, The San Antonio Express-News
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Top stories in higher ed for Monday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
June 11, 2018
Why Do So Many Students Drop Out of College? And What Can Be Done About It?
Jeffrey J. Selingo, The Washington Post
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

With the pressure on colleges to retain more students and get them to graduation, campuses are spending an increasing share of their budgets on student-success efforts. They are installing technology that constantly tracks performance, hiring professional advising staffs to assist in course selection, and designing opportunities on and off campus to better engage students in their undergraduate careers.

Now, there is a greater sense of urgency to these activities. A surge in enrollment of first-generation, low-income, and minority students is expected in the coming years—all groups historically not well-served by higher education.

Playbook of Pairing Education and Automation Makes Employers and Workers More Resilient in the Future of Work
Van Ton-Quinlivan, California Economy Reporting
SHARE: Facebook Twitter
When employers co-invest in educating and training their employees, they not only help remove financial barriers to a college education, but their company reaps benefits, as well.

Employees who receive educational benefits are more likely to be retained longer, be promoted, or make a lateral move within the company. These same employees also tend to have fewer unexcused absences and be more engaged on the job.
Housing Costs—More Than Tuition—Are Crushing California’s Low-Income College Students
Vanessa Rancaño, KQED
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

When Sadia Kahn was accepted to UC Berkeley, she struggled to find affordable housing as a student-parent. She's not alone.

Attending a university in California can be a financial burden beyond the means of many college hopefuls. Rising tuition is compounded by the lack of affordable housing in the state and the high cost of living.  

In a New Land, Another Barrier
Meredith Kolodner, The Hechinger Report/The New York Times
SHARE: Facebook Twitter
Estrella Rivas is one of more than 690,000 young people brought to this country illegally as children and temporarily granted the right to stay under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. 

Now many DACA recipients, including Rivas, are ready for college. But the price can be prohibitive. Rivas is fortunate. She will attend Rutgers University with help from a New Jersey program that allows DACA recipients to receive the same state financial aid as other residents.
A Good Time to Head to the Hill
David Baime, Community College Daily
Study: Boys’ Interest in STEM Careers Declining
Tala Salem, U.S. News & World Report
Healing a Divided Economy
Heather Boerner, Community College Daily
Opinion: What Equal Opportunity in Education Really Means
Deborah Beck, The San Antonio Express-News
Facebook Twitter
Top stories in higher ed for Monday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
June 11, 2018
Why Do So Many Students Drop Out of College? And What Can Be Done About It?
Jeffrey J. Selingo, The Washington Post
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

With the pressure on colleges to retain more students and get them to graduation, campuses are spending an increasing share of their budgets on student-success efforts. They are installing technology that constantly tracks performance, hiring professional advising staffs to assist in course selection, and designing opportunities on and off campus to better engage students in their undergraduate careers.

Now, there is a greater sense of urgency to these activities. A surge in enrollment of first-generation, low-income, and minority students is expected in the coming years—all groups historically not well-served by higher education.

Playbook of Pairing Education and Automation Makes Employers and Workers More Resilient in the Future of Work
Van Ton-Quinlivan, California Economy Reporting
SHARE: Facebook Twitter
When employers co-invest in educating and training their employees, they not only help remove financial barriers to a college education, but their company reaps benefits, as well.

Employees who receive educational benefits are more likely to be retained longer, be promoted, or make a lateral move within the company. These same employees also tend to have fewer unexcused absences and be more engaged on the job.
Housing Costs—More Than Tuition—Are Crushing California’s Low-Income College Students
Vanessa Rancaño, KQED
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

When Sadia Kahn was accepted to UC Berkeley, she struggled to find affordable housing as a student-parent. She's not alone.

Attending a university in California can be a financial burden beyond the means of many college hopefuls. Rising tuition is compounded by the lack of affordable housing in the state and the high cost of living.  

In a New Land, Another Barrier
Meredith Kolodner, The Hechinger Report/The New York Times
SHARE: Facebook Twitter
Estrella Rivas is one of more than 690,000 young people brought to this country illegally as children and temporarily granted the right to stay under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. 

Now many DACA recipients, including Rivas, are ready for college. But the price can be prohibitive. Rivas is fortunate. She will attend Rutgers University with help from a New Jersey program that allows DACA recipients to receive the same state financial aid as other residents.
A Good Time to Head to the Hill
David Baime, Community College Daily
Study: Boys’ Interest in STEM Careers Declining
Tala Salem, U.S. News & World Report
Healing a Divided Economy
Heather Boerner, Community College Daily
Opinion: What Equal Opportunity in Education Really Means
Deborah Beck, The San Antonio Express-News
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