Top stories in higher ed for Wednesday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
October 16, 2019
Jamie Merisotis
In Their Voices: Undocumented in California Public Colleges and Universities
The Campaign for College Opportunity
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Nearly 27 percent of the United States’ undocumented immigrants reside in California. Among this diverse population, however, few adults have a college degree. Conservative estimates find that between 64,000 and 86,000 undocumented students are enrolled in California’s public higher education systems. Losing, or even underutilizing, this talent pool poses a threat to the state’s future workforce and economy.

This brief offers insight into the experiences of undocumented students and how state and campus leaders can become better allies to ensure they have the resources and support needed to succeed. 

Jamie Merisotis
Free College, Even for Adults
Meredith Kolodner, The New York Times
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The tuition-free college movement has been taking hold throughout the country, but one group of students is being left out: adults.

Even though nearly 70 percent of Americans age 25 or older lack a college degree, most of the 300 free college Promise programs across 44 states do not allow them to enroll. 

Some states are recognizing this oversight and taking action. Last year, Tennessee began offering adults free tuition at all of its community colleges, including students who go part time. Hawaii’s program also is open to adults, and next year Washington State will open its Promise program to low- and middle-income adults over 25.

Jamie Merisotis
How One College Helps All Students Gain Digital Skills
Beckie Supiano. The Chronicle of Higher Education
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Vinny Ong, a Bryn Mawr College sophomore who plans to major in linguistics, wasn’t looking for digital skills when she signed up for an internship at the library. She ended up developing them along the way.

Ong and other traditional-age students are digital natives. But there’s a difference between familiarity and understanding. Professors at Bryn Mawr have wrestled with this issue for years. In response, the college defined a series of digital competencies and embedded them in the undergraduate experience.

Jamie Merisotis
Maintaining Your Enrollment Pipeline: How to Help Students Choose You
The EvoLLLution
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Students are consumers, and they choose a postsecondary institution employing the same decision-making process they use to make any other major purchase. In order to stand out to prospective students, institutions must focus on improving the overall student experience—not just programs and courses.

In this interview, Michael Patton of Pacific Oaks College reflects on why schools tend to lose their students and what leaders can do to make the most impact. 

House Dems’ Vision for Higher Ed
Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed
Do Colleges Truly Understand What Students Want From Them?
Michael B. Horn and Bob Moesta, Harvard Business Review
Students Give Guided Pathways a Thumbs Up
Mathew Dembicki, Community College Daily
Filling Classroom Vacancies Requires Better Solutions
Ben DeGrow, Mackinac Center for Public Policy
College, on Purpose
Complete College America
The Right Mix of Academic Programs
The Chronicle of Higher Education
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Top stories in higher ed for Wednesday
Lumina Foundation is committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025.
October 16, 2019
Jamie Merisotis
In Their Voices: Undocumented in California Public Colleges and Universities
The Campaign for College Opportunity
SHARE:  Facebook • Twitter

Nearly 27 percent of the United States’ undocumented immigrants reside in California. Among this diverse population, however, few adults have a college degree. Conservative estimates find that between 64,000 and 86,000 undocumented students are enrolled in California’s public higher education systems. Losing, or even underutilizing, this talent pool poses a threat to the state’s future workforce and economy.

This brief offers insight into the experiences of undocumented students and how state and campus leaders can become better allies to ensure they have the resources and support needed to succeed. 

Jamie Merisotis
Free College, Even for Adults
Meredith Kolodner, The New York Times
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

The tuition-free college movement has been taking hold throughout the country, but one group of students is being left out: adults.

Even though nearly 70 percent of Americans age 25 or older lack a college degree, most of the 300 free college Promise programs across 44 states do not allow them to enroll. 

Some states are recognizing this oversight and taking action. Last year, Tennessee began offering adults free tuition at all of its community colleges, including students who go part time. Hawaii’s program also is open to adults, and next year Washington State will open its Promise program to low- and middle-income adults over 25.

Jamie Merisotis
How One College Helps All Students Gain Digital Skills
Beckie Supiano. The Chronicle of Higher Education
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Vinny Ong, a Bryn Mawr College sophomore who plans to major in linguistics, wasn’t looking for digital skills when she signed up for an internship at the library. She ended up developing them along the way.

Ong and other traditional-age students are digital natives. But there’s a difference between familiarity and understanding. Professors at Bryn Mawr have wrestled with this issue for years. In response, the college defined a series of digital competencies and embedded them in the undergraduate experience.

Jamie Merisotis
Maintaining Your Enrollment Pipeline: How to Help Students Choose You
The EvoLLLution
SHARE:  Facebook Twitter

Students are consumers, and they choose a postsecondary institution employing the same decision-making process they use to make any other major purchase. In order to stand out to prospective students, institutions must focus on improving the overall student experience—not just programs and courses.

In this interview, Michael Patton of Pacific Oaks College reflects on why schools tend to lose their students and what leaders can do to make the most impact. 

House Dems’ Vision for Higher Ed
Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed
Do Colleges Truly Understand What Students Want From Them?
Michael B. Horn and Bob Moesta, Harvard Business Review
Students Give Guided Pathways a Thumbs Up
Mathew Dembicki, Community College Daily
Filling Classroom Vacancies Requires Better Solutions
Ben DeGrow, Mackinac Center for Public Policy
College, on Purpose
Complete College America
The Right Mix of Academic Programs
The Chronicle of Higher Education
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