We’ve seen close elections before; let’s commit to letting the process work—and to making the country better
Federal Policy

We’ve seen close elections before; let’s commit to letting the process work—and to making the country better

Poll workers in masks assist voters.

This morning, it appears many 2020 races—notably a divisive presidential election—won’t be decided for a longer period than we’re accustomed to, as many paper ballots are yet to be counted.

It’s important in our democracy that voters have their voices heard, and so we must resist efforts to prejudge the results of contests.

By allowing election workers to carry out their responsibilities, we honor the resilience of Americans who turned out in historically high numbers, amid a pandemic, often facing long lines and deliberate barriers.

In the meantime, we need to stay focused on what unites us as Americans.

We need to focus on ensuring that our great democracy endures. We have held successful presidential elections even in times of greater crisis, including a bloody Civil War, the Great Depression, and two World Wars.


We can rise to this occasion and this test of our democratic system of governance.

Regardless of how the election turns out, nearly half of the country will be disappointed. That much is clear from the passion stirred by the election.

We must continue to build bridges. We must listen to each other, find common ground – and move forward to build an even stronger society, one in which people of all races, ethnicities, and income levels can achieve economic and social mobility.

We will remain focused on this at Lumina Foundation as we pursue the national goal of 60 percent of American adults holding a college degree or shorter-term credential of value, such as a certificate or industry-recognized certification, within the next five years.

Only through a better-educated nation can we meet the challenges ahead.

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