FOREWORD

Defining intellectual and developmental disabilities

The term “developmental disabilities” encompasses a wide range of physical and mental disabilities. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, parents report some sort of developmental disability in one of six children. Intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder both are considered developmental disabilities.

READ MORE arrow

Utah State program links students to good jobs

Aggies Elevated is a two-year program at Utah State University that is designed to serve students with intellectual disabilities well – not merely by providing opportunities for learning, but also by helping students land competitive, “real-world” employment after they graduate. The staff-intensive Aggies Elevated program typically serves about 15 students at a time. As of a few weeks after the 2019 class graduated, 93 percent of its graduates had found jobs.

READ THIS STORYarrow

‘Special ed goes to college’? Not at Millersville

The goal of the Integrated Studies program at Millersville University is to fully merge its students into college life. The 25 students on the university’s southeastern Pennsylvania campus live with roommates who aren’t part of the program. No classes or social events are designed exclusively for them. They join clubs on campus, but they do not constitute their own club. Because of their developmental or intellectual disabilities, they need to work longer and harder than typical students to learn and understand. But college life, with all its pleasures, challenges, and opportunities, is now within their reach.

READ THIS STORYarrow

Western Kentucky serves students on the spectrum

Western Kentucky University’s Circle of Support surrounds high-functioning students on the autism spectrum. Within the Circle — which is a feature of the university’s Kelly Autism Program (KAP) — services are robust: everything from single-room housing to frequent attendance at required “study table” sessions. The sessions are staffed by KAP employees who tutor students on academics while also advising them on time management, social skills, and priority setting. The program also features a full-time mental health counselor and separate mentoring to help students with social interaction.

READ THIS STORYarrow
PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

To achieve true diversity in thinking and learning beyond high school, students with developmental disabilities must also be included.

READ THE FULL MESSAGE arrow
BobCaylor

The stories in this issue of Focus were reported and written by Bob Caylor, a journalist with more than 30 years of experience at newspapers in Minnesota, Ohio, and Indiana. At the News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne, Indiana, he was an award-winning columnist and editorial writer and reported extensively on business and environmental issues. He is now a writer and photographer for Easterseals Arc of Northeast Indiana, as well as a freelance journalist and book editor. He also is ghostwriting a book on investing.

Writing | Bob Caylor
Editing
| David S. Powell
Editorial assistance | Ruth Holladay
Photography | Shawn Spence (Utah), Michael Confer (Pennsylvania), William DeShazer (Kentucky)
Design | IronGate Creative

Focus Archive

SEARCH FOR ISSUES BY TOPIC

Show Topics
All Topics
Adult students
Black male student success
Community partnerships
Competency-based education
Comprehensive student records
Economical instruction
Employer-sponsored tuition reimbursement
Non-degree credentials
Prison education
Rural students
Student supports
Students with Development Disabilities
Previous Issue
Next Issue
Loading More Articles