News and Views

Ending Racial Injustice

More  Arrow Icon

Nine ways funders can increase diversity in higher ed in a world without affirmative action

In the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s June 29 decision to end affirmative action in college admissions, a group of foundations quickly issued a joint statement condemning the decision, saying, “The Supreme Court’s decision impedes colleges and universities from selecting their own student bodies and fully addressing systemic racial inequalities that persist.”

With the end of race-conscious college admissions, Americans have reached common ground on what’s needed next

What will American colleges and universities look like now that the Supreme Court has upended affirmative action? The evidence is clear: As we’ve seen from states that had already banned race-conscious admissions prior to the court’s recent decision, enrollment for students of color will decline. We can avoid going backward only if institutions embrace new approaches for increasing student diversity and abolish advantages for the privileged, such as legacy preferences.

Today's Credentials

More  Arrow Icon

Today's Institutions

More  Arrow Icon

We need more students at elite colleges from low- and middle-income families, not fewer

Even with American higher education’s need for reform, our system is the world’s envy. This is partly because of the diversity of institutions students in the United States can benefit from, including prestigious, world-class universities and research centers. For a privileged few, success at an elite school can open doors to service in the halls of Congress, the Supreme Court, and the inner sanctum of the White House. These graduates often land coveted positions at Fortune 500 companies, investment banks, and tech startups.

Today's Students

More  Arrow Icon

One-quarter of Hispanic students face discrimination, leading many to consider leaving college

More Hispanic students are seeking educational opportunities after high school, with a notable upswing over the past decade in the percentage of Hispanics earning degrees. But the pandemic brought unfortunate setbacks to Hispanic enrollment, and a new study also reveals other alarming hurdles many Hispanic students face on their educational journeys.

More News and Stories

We need more students at elite colleges from low- and middle-income families, not fewer

Even with American higher education’s need for reform, our system is the world’s envy. This is partly because of the diversity of institutions students in the United States can benefit from, including prestigious, world-class universities and research centers. For a privileged few, success at an elite school can open doors to service in the halls of Congress, the Supreme Court, and the inner sanctum of the White House. These graduates often land coveted positions at Fortune 500 companies, investment banks, and tech startups.
Okello holding his child Okello playa with Ezekiel. Okello and his children, Emily (10) and Ezekiel (3).
Photojournalism

The college climb steepens

For many of today’s students, pursuing higher education was a struggle even before the pandemic. Today, as shown in this candid, close-up look at the lives of five low-income students, the college challenge is immense.

Photos and text by RACHEL BUJALSKI..

Explore Stories

Stay up to date on the latest news and research.

Subscribe

Sign up to receive Lumina newsletters and publications. Updates from the worlds of learning and work—free in your inbox.

Subscribe

Daily News Archive

Lumina compiles a free daily digest of the best stories in higher education on topics such as college affordability, quality assurance, state and federal policy, and more.

Daily Headlines